Bean, Corn & Pumpkin Risotto

Brimming with fall’s freshest flavors, this Southwestern spin on risotto is a cozy treat for your next Meatless Monday meal. This recipe comes to us from Jenn at Veggie Inspired Journey.

Serves 6 [Read more…]

New York City Mayor Announces Meatless Monday School Program to Tackle Climate Change and Obesity

This week, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced that 15 public schools will offer Meatless Monday as part of a pilot program, with the potential to expand throughout the school system. Every Monday, students in the pilot will enjoy breakfast and lunch menus featuring meatless meals. De Blasio also added a personal commitment to start the practice at Gracie Mansion, his official residence “…we are now going to be instituting Meatless Mondays as well…We’re starting a new habit and I’m looking forward to it.” [Read more…]

Just BEETs by the Fit Fathers Crew

Like eating beets we make it cool getting fit and tossing chips in favor of abs that are ripped and cruciferous green veggies which help prevent sickness.

Yoga keeps the frame limber while “pull” and “push” ups harden muscles like timber, it’s a yearly wellness cycle from summer to winter.

Our founder Kimatni Rawlins is also known as K-Raw for a reason due to his habit of eating straight from the garden when organic fruits of choice are in season.

Pay homage to the Most High for positive vibrations and sun energy by encouraging the masses from indigenous nations to simply choose life over procrastination.

One Love!

 

 

The Science of Plant-Based Nutrition and Health

Nearly Half of Deaths from Heart Disease, Stroke, Obesity, and Type 2 Diabetes May Be Prevented with Improved Nutrition, According to a New Review Published in Nutrients

Plant-based eating patterns continue to soar in popularity and a group of nutrition researchers outline the science behind this sustainable trend in a review paper, entitled “Cardiometabolic benefits of plant-based diets,” which appears as an online advance in the Aug. 9, 2017, edition of Nutrients.  The review will publish in a future special edition, entitled “The Science of Vegetarian Nutrition and Health.”

The review outlines how a plant-based diet, which is naturally low in calories, saturated fat, and cholesterol, and rich in nutrients, like fiber and antioxidants, could  be one tool, in addition to adopting a healthful lifestyle, used to improve nutrition intake and reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.

The authors, Hana Kahleova, M.D., Ph.D., Susan Levin, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D., and Neal Barnard, M.D., F.A.C.C., analyzed clinical research studies and reviews published until May 2017. Their research finds a plant-based diet, built around vegetables, fruits, whole grains, and legumes, can improve nutrient intake and help manage body weight and glycemic control, improve cholesterol, lower blood pressure, and reverse atherosclerosis, or the narrowing of the arteries caused by the accumulation of arterial plaque.

“The future of health care starts on our plates,” says Dr. Kahleova, the lead study author and the director of clinical research at the nonprofit Physicians Committee. “The science clearly shows food is medicine, which is a powerful message for physicians to pass on to their patients and for policymakers to consider as they propose modifications for health care reform and discuss potential amendment to the 2018 Farm Bill.”

To understand the health benefits of a plant-based diet, the researchers analyze its structure:

Fiber

Fiber contributes to bulk in the diet without adding digestible calories, thus leading to satiety and weight loss. Additionally, soluble fiber binds with bile acids in the small intestines, which helps reduce cholesterol and stabilize blood sugar.

Plant-Based Rx: Aim to eat at least 35 grams of dietary fiber a day. The average American consumes 16 grams of dietary fiber each day.

Fats

Plant-based diets are lower in saturated fat and dietary cholesterol. Replacing saturated fats with polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats can decrease insulin resistance, a risk factor for metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

Plant-Based Rx: Swap meat and dairy products, oils, and high-fat processed foods for smaller portions of plant staples, like a few avocado slices or a small handful of nuts and seeds, which are rich in polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats.

Plant Protein

Vegetable proteins reduce the concentrations of blood lipids, reduce the risk of obesity and cardiovascular disease, and may have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects.

Plant-Based Rx: Legumes, or lentils, beans, and peas, are naturally rich in protein and fiber. Try topping leafy green salads with lentils, black beans, edamame, or chickpeas.

Plant Sterols 

Plant sterols that have a structure similar to that of cholesterol reduce cardiovascular disease risk and mortality, have anti-inflammatory effects, and positively affect coagulation, platelet function and endothelial function, which helps reduce blood clots, increases blood flow, and stabilizes glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Plant-Based Rx: Consume a high intake of antioxidants and micronutrients, including plant sterols, from whole plant foods, like vegetables, fruits, grains, nuts, beans, and seeds. A plant-based diet supports cardio-metabolic benefits through several independent mechanisms. The synergistic effect of whole plant foods may be greater than a mere additional effect of eating isolated nutrients.

“To make significant health changes, we have to make significant diet changes,” concludes Dr. Kahleova. “A colorful plant-based diet works well for anyone, whether you’re an athlete looking to boost energy, performance, and recovery by enabling a higher efficiency of blood flow, which equates to oxygen conversion, or if you’re a physician who wants to help patients lose extra weight, lower blood pressure, and improve their cholesterol.”

Dr. Kahleova and the study authors recommend using a plant-based diet as an effective tool to treat and prevent cardiometaoblic disease, which they would like to see promoted through future dietary guidelines and nutrition policy recommendations.

For more information about plant-based eating patterns, visit NutritionMD.org.

Founded in 1985, the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine is a nonprofit health organization that promotes preventive medicine, conducts clinical research, and encourages higher standards for ethics and effectiveness in research and medical training.

Black Bean and Sweet Potato Chili

This black bean and sweet potato chili is super simple and rich with health benefits. It can be made with canned beans for convenience.

Makes 6 servings

Ingredients

1 tablespoon vegetable broth or water
1 cup onion
3 garlic cloves
1 teaspoon salt
2 teaspoons cumin powder
2 teaspoons chili powder
1 teaspoon oregano
1 1/2 cups cooked or canned black beans
1 1/2 cups diced sweet potatoes
2 cups canned diced tomatoes
2 cups water

[Read more…]

5 Tips for Storing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

By  & Center for Nutrition Studies

Fresh produce is part of a healthy eating plan and lifestyle. Storing produce properly is important. We go to the store and buy delicious-looking food, but then we get home and end up storing it improperly, or we get busy and forget about it. Then we find our refrigerator having the aroma of overripe or rotting fruits and veggies. One way we can spend less and eat healthier is by storing our fresh food properly. [Read more…]

Grilled Corn, Tomato and Avocado Bread Cups

Thinking about firing up the grill any time soon? Try this simple, snackable recipe featuring some of summer’s most sensational (and grill-able!) produce. It’s perfect for feeding a crowd and easily doubles or triples. This recipe comes to Meatless Monday from Dixya of Food, Pleasure and Health. [Read more…]

Organic versus Conventional: Which has More Nutrients?

Written By Michael Greger M.D. FACLM 

Are organic foods safer and healthier than conventional alternatives? Those are two separate questions. Some consumers are interested in getting more nutrients; others are more concerned about getting fewer pesticides. Let’s do nutrition first.

As seen in my video, Are Organic Foods More Nutritious?, hundreds of studies have been reviewed and researchers didn’t find significant differences for most of the traditional nutrients like vitamins and minerals. They concluded that despite the widespread perception that organically produced foods are more nutritious, they didn’t find robust evidence to support that perception. They did, however, find higher levels of phenolic phytonutrients in organic. [Read more…]

Chickpea Tacos

Please enjoy these delicious Chickpea Tacos from www.TheCheeseTrap.org. Serve with leafy greens, in a bowl, or stuffed in taco shells. Serve this mildly spicy (or not!) taco filling in taco shells with Avocado Cream, lettuce, and other fresh veggies like chopped tomatoes, jicama, or cucumber. Or serve the filling simply over rice with the toppings, or tuck all into a whole-grain tortilla. [Read more…]

Meatless Monday Movement Celebrates Earth Day

This Saturday, April 22, is Earth Day, an annual event to honor our planet we call home. For those who want to make a positive difference on the environment this week, and every week of the year, there’s an easy delicious way: join the Meatless Monday movement. Meatless Monday is a grassroots movement organized and promoted by advocates around the world who inspire individuals, schools, restaurants and even entire governments to get involved. Currently, there are home-grown initiatives in more than 40 countries, pledging to “one day a week, cut out meat” for their health and the health of the planet.

Earth Day turns 47 years old this year and now more than ever we need to join our efforts to achieve the United Nations’ 2015 Climate Change Conference (COP21) goal: to limit the increase in emissions by 2050 to less than two percent. But even with successful changes from energy and transportation sectors, this goal cannot be met—unless everyone also decreases meat consumption. Nearly 15% of global Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions are due to production of meat, dairy, and eggs. In many countries, meat consumption is an indicator of wealth; consequently, as incomes rise, the intake of meat and dairy is also rising across the globe.

That’s why there’s no better time to join the Meatless Monday movement. These global climate changes – from Greenland’s melting ice sheet to rising sea levels threatening the islands of Kiribati, India – continue to be in the headlines. And a major contributor to many of these ecological harms is meat consumption, which is projected to double by 2050, as more developing countries adopt a Western meat-centric diet and the overall world population rises.

This Earth Day, countless schools, restaurants and civic communities around the world are doing their part to turn back the clock on global warming and its innumerable ills. By joining the Meatless Monday movement, you’re signaling your willingness to fight for health: the health of both you and the planet.