Philip A. Jackson on Fit Fatherhood

Life moved rapidly for me after high school. I became a dad five months before my 21st birthday and married at the youthful age of 18. For me, fatherhood has been the greatest teacher that I have ever had. Before my wife and I had kids everything was about my plans. The most lofty being the idea to retire by 40. Well, dad life has taught me that anybody can make money, but it takes a father to change the world.

I believe that many of the challenges we face today are because men have been forgotten. It’s not that we were left out intentionally, or that the progress we have made is bad. What I mean is that in the course of lifting everyone up men have been left behind. One in three children in America will be raised without a father — not because of hardship — but because we have stopped teaching our boys how to be men. We now see a crucial piece of our world being uncultivated and unchallenged and it is devastating our communities. The world needs men because they play key roles in both healthy masculinity and the interpersonal development of children. Simply put, everything I have read and experienced as a dad has led me to one conclusion: Dads matter and matter a lot!

In the Bible there is a parable about three servants who are given talents (money) to invest while their master is away. Upon return he found that two of his servants were faithful and doubled the value of what was entrusted to them. The third was condemned because he was afraid of losing it and buried what he was given. I believe that we as parents have a similar responsibility. I view the role of Fit Fathers as a sacred responsibility to raise children while cultivating them into strong, independent adults who will add value in others. Being a dad means changing the world and preserving everything that is good. Again, anybody can make money, yet father responsibilities are the greatest roles of all!

Philip A. Jackson, Senior Field Representative for the First Congressional of Oklahoma

 

Philip A. Jackson on Fit Fatherhood