7th Annual Nomadic Journey: Trekking the Incan Citadel of Machu Picchu

Experienced by Kimatni D Rawlins

For my 7th Annual Nomadic Journey to enlighten the mind, body, and soul, I adventurously explored the remote citadel of Machu Picchu by way of trekking the awe-inspiring Inca Trail. Consisting of continuous miles of stone paths and thousands of original rock-strewn Incan steps carved from the Andes Mountains centuries ago, the short expedition was spiritually uplifting and full of awakening sustenance.

The Journey

 

You will fly into Jorge Chavez International Airport outside of Lima from your home destination and then take a short flight into Cusco to prepare for the adventure to Machu Picchu. In my case, United Airlines routed me on a direct Business Class flight from Newark. It is advised to enjoy Cusco for at least two days to acclimate to the altitude before hiking. But please make sure to visit Green Point while in Cusco for some of the most delicious and purest vegan food the city has to offer.

Whether you decide to engage in an extended 4-day hike to Peru’s 7th Wonder, or ride lavishly aboard the 1920s-styled carriages of the luxurious Belmond Hiram Bingham train through the Sacred Valley, the enchanting experience will replenish your temple with restorative Andean wisdom and vitality. More affordable options include either IncaRail or PeruRail from San Pedro station in Cusco. I chose the 1-day Inca Trail trek with Sam Travel Peru, which required me to train it to stop 104 (common hiker’s drop-off point) for a deeper understanding of the archeological site. This option was about $400 from the experienced Peruvian tour group. My guide Miguel educated me on the history of the Incas and vicariously showcased the ways of the ancient world.  I also met some new friends from London, Marta and Nuno, who were just as adventurous.

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Sanctity of Life: The Recipe for Aging Gracefully

My goal in life is to meet and spend quality time with as many beautiful souls as possible such as 80-year family friend George Maggot from St. Helena Island off the coast of West Africa. In London he invited me over for a home cooked veggie lunch that he prepared singlehandedly, a stroll in the garden park and life conversations to appease both our spirits. George walks a few miles daily, eats one main meal a day (mainly veggies and legumes), nibbles on fruits and nuts, maintains  a strong social life, tends to the garden a few hours a day, volunteers his time to help his neighbors and continues to travel to places like his second home in Ghana where he spent 40 years.

I do believe my soul gravitates more towards elders and wise men and women who understand my path deeper than the majority. I am humbled and grateful to be blessed with opportunities that continuously allow me to learn and experience. Thank you George!

-Kimatni D. Rawlins